Why are you playing wedges from the 1950’s

Here is some technical info on why you should really look at your wedges and consider upgrading them..

From Ben Hogan Golf
A Bit of Wedge History
Very few golfers are aware that the wedges in their bag bear a puzzling similarity to those dating back to the 1950s. A close examination of all the wedge market leaders reveals a remarkable similarity to those of 50 to 60 years ago.

wedge1
The invention of the original sand wedge dates to the late 1930s and is credited to professional legend Gene Sarazen, who discovered that he could blast shots from the bunkers by adding a wide and heavy flange to the bottom of a niblick. Very quickly thereafter, tour professionals learned that this sand wedge could also be a good choice for certain greenside recoveries. But in his 1949 book, “Power Golf”, Ben Hogan said the maximum distance for a sand wedge was 40 yards. This came from a man who listed his maximum driver distance at 300 yards.
With any golf club, the ball flight performance is directly related to the distribution of the clubhead mass. The reason for that observation by the greatest ball striker the game had ever known was that he found the sand wedge’s very low center of mass and resulting thin upper face, delivered inconsistent distances on swings of increased power.
Over the following decades, this classic sand wedge design concept has been applied to lofts as low as 46 degrees and as high as 64 degrees. Almost all manufacturers apply this same historic weighting scheme regardless of loft. But, as golf has evolved to more of a power game, golfers of all skill levels hit more and more full swing shots with their wedges, and this unchanged design concept of “wedges” has not been
innovated to accommodate this expanded use of the higher lofted clubs.
This lack of adaption of wedges to the way they are used in the modern game leaves golfers of all skill levels fighting excessively high trajectories and the resulting inconsistent distances with their high loft clubs. Our proprietary research with over 40,000 golfers of all skill levels reveals that the vast majority are challenged by modern wedge design.
[NOTE: Evidence of the lack of innovation in the wedge category was illustrated by one of the market leaders in wedges introducing its “new” wedge by touting it was a remake of its 1988 model. In what other category in golf equipment could that have remotely happened?]
Precision Is Back
After over two years of research and development followed by extensive prototyping and testing (both by swing robots and by golfers of all skill levels), the Ben Hogan Golf Equipment Company introduced the TK wedges to help players hit it closer, score better, and learn how well — and how consistently — a set of wedges can perform.
Thank you, Mr. Hogan, for showing us the way. This is for you.

Problem #1: Excessively High Trajectories And Inconsistent Distances

Proprietary research by the Ben Hogan Golf Equipment Company reveals the lack of innovation in
wedges causes golfers of all skill levels to fight excessively high trajectories and inconsistent distances. As indicated by the following research with 40,000 golfers of all skill levels, it is the higher handicap golfers who are most challenged by modern wedge design.

wedge2

wedge3
The Ben Hogan Golf Equipment Company has completely redesigned the weight distribution across the
entire range of wedges from 48 to 63 degrees (44-47 degree lofts being added for 2016 so that you can also replace your set-match “P-club” with this technology). In this revolutionary design concept, you will
notice the weight is distributed higher on the clubhead compared to other brands, which delivers more
consistent trajectory and smash factor on shots hit away from the center impact area. Furthermore, each loft has its own specific weight
distribution to deliver optimum results for that given loft.
On both swing robots and live golfer testing, we measured trajectory, smash factor and distance variations on shots hit at various points on the face. Wedges built on traditional weighting designs delivered distance differentials as large as 50 feet across only a 7/8” vertical miss pattern. [The TK wedges reduced those differentials by as much as 73%.] As further validation of the performance superiority, a survey of early purchasers of the TK wedges revealed nearly 100% would purchase them again, which could only
happen because these purchasers experienced a high degree of satisfaction with the promised performance.
The following chart reflects robot testing of leading 52º gap wedges against the weighting scheme of the TK
wedges. Impact points were charted along a 7/8” vertical line from the lower portion of the center face.

Solution: Innovative Progressive Weighting
The Ben Hogan Golf Equipment Company has completely redesigned the weight distribution across the
entire range of wedges from 48 to 63 degrees (44-47 degree lofts being added for 2016 so that you can also replace your set-match “P-club” with this technology). In this revolutionary design concept, you will
notice the weight is distributed higher on the clubhead compared to other brands, which delivers more
consistent trajectory and smash factor on shots hit away from the center impact area. Furthermore, each loft has its own specific weight
distribution to deliver optimum results for that given loft.

wedge4

On both swing robots and live golfer testing, we measured trajectory, smash factor and distance variations on shots hit at various points on the face. Wedges built on traditional weighting designs delivered distance differentials as large as 50 feet across only a 7/8” vertical miss pattern. [The TK wedges reduced those differentials by as much as 73%.] As further validation of the performance superiority, a survey of early purchasers of the TK wedges revealed nearly 100% would purchase them again, which could only
happen because these purchasers experienced a high degree of satisfaction with the promised performance.
The following chart reflects robot testing of leading 52º gap wedges against the weighting scheme of the TK
wedges. Impact points were charted along a 7/8” vertical line from the lower portion of the center face

wedge5.

As noted previously, each loft in the TK wedge line has its own specific weighting distribution design, with the weight disbursed more evenly in both vertical and horizontal directions from center face. This allows more mass to be placed behind various possible impact points on the face. The illustration shows that the weight of the 51º wedge, for example, is arranged higher on the clubhead and incorporates more perimeter weight than on the higher lofts, as the 51º wedge is used with a more forceful swing, and a lower, more penetrating trajectory is desired. Likewise, the weight distribution on the higher lofted 57º wedge is slightly lower on the clubhead to aid in greenside recovery shots and shorter pitches for which these clubs are more often used.
Evidence of the performance
virtues of the TK weighting design can be taken from the fact that the market share leader in wedges has
introduced a visible change in weight distribution into their 2016 product line that is quite obviously inspired by Ben Hogan technology.

All information listed above is direct from Ben Hogan Golf Company.

Stay tuned for Problem 2 and the Hogan Solution…

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